Episode # 79 – Judith Glynn on Media Exposure and Freelance Writing

In Uncategorized by Simon Whistler12 Comments

judithglynncoverIn today’s interview I talk to Judith Glynn about her varied writing background. From freelance travel writing, to fiction, to memoirs, Judith has written all across the board, and this is an interview that dives into that background, as well as what she is working on currently. We also talk about gaining exposure for your books in the traditional media, and what value that might have to a self-published author.


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Links:

Judith’s Amazon Profile

The Street or Me – Judith’s memoir.

Mentions:

Meetup.com – Great place to meet local people who are also writers.

Joel Friedlander – Book designer.

Bibliocrunch – Collaborate with editors, designers, and marketers.

Audiobooks for Indies – My guide for indies authors on creating audiobooks.

Show notes:

Background

Judith wrote her first book as a diary and later came back to edit and put it out. Before that she had been writing travel non-fiction for major publications so had a background in freelance writing. This slowed down in the 90s when Judith started a business. She missed writing and went back to writing freelance travel articles. This work is not well paid, but you do get free trips!

Traditional World

Judith tried the traditional world for a while. Living in New York she decided to go to some local events and try and get interest from a publisher. Nothing ended up going through and so she decided to do it herself.

Action Steps

–       There are many potential revenue streams for writers, not just the sale of books. Is there writing work you can pick up, get paid for, and also learn a lot about writing from?

–       The production of your book is so essential. If you haven’t, plan out who you are going to need (or the process you are going to have to go through) to get the book right. How much is this going to cost? How long is it going to take?

–       Typos. The beauty of self-publishing is that you can fix your ebook very quickly. Have you got emails from readers about typos? If yes, fix them, and re-upload the book, it’s easy.

–       Is there a local critique group you can join? This will be really important for improving your craft.

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Leave a comment below or get in touch with Simon by email at simon@rockingselfpublishing.com

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Simon WhistlerEpisode # 79 – Judith Glynn on Media Exposure and Freelance Writing
  • Guest

    Nice interview, but I find it interesting that people can write books that make no money and be happy. I treat what I do as a business, therefore everything I spend (and I try to keep that mow) needs to make money. Spending $5000 on a book that sells just 3000 copies is pointless to me (but maybe not to others). Everyone is different. My journey is learning how to make a living from it while being an unknown unknown, until I become just an unknown and I will make many many mistakes while I do it. (If you are not sure what an unknown unknown is, it means not only does no one know you – they don’t even know they don’t know you!)

  • Guest

    Nice interview, but I find it interesting that people can write books that make no money and be happy. I treat what I do as a business, therefore everything I spend (and I try to keep that as low as possible) needs to make money. Spending $5000 on a book that sells just 3000 copies is pointless to me (but maybe not to others). Everyone is different. My journey is learning how to make a living from it while being an ‘unknown unknown’, until I become just an ‘unknown’ and I will make many many mistakes while I do it and probably change my opinion on things many times over.

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  • D B Daglish

    Nice interview, but I find it interesting that people can write books that make no money and be happy. I treat what I do as a business, therefore everything I spend (and I try to keep that as low as possible) needs to make money. Spending $5000 on a book that sells just 3000 copies is pointless to me (but maybe not to others). Everyone is different. My journey is learning how to make a living from it while being an ‘unknown unknown’, until I become just an ‘unknown’ and I will make many many mistakes while I do it and probably change my opinion on things many times over.

    • SimonRSP

      Yep, I think it really depends what you want to get out of writing. RSP tends to have a strong focus towards those who are working to make a good living from writing, but I feel it is important to have a balance on the show to give a fair representation to everyone, for we all write for different reasons 🙂

    • Judith Glynn

      HI DB, I hope it’s not bad manners to respond to your comment but feel clarity is needed. I do make money selling my books but not enough, to date, to cover all costs. In addition to online sites, I sell at book events and in a few bookstores. Writing well takes a long time as does selling books. What I knew from the get-go if I wanted a quality brand and to be recognized as putting out a quality product, was I’d have to pay for professional services. What would follow would be hard-to-come-by solid reviews, endorsements and first-class PR. For me, at least, it’s the building of the brand/platform that leads to bigger and bigger sales. In the meantime, I’ll continue along very happy to keep writing with book three in the works. And thank you for listening to the interview. I found Simon to be a terrific sounding board.

      • DB Daglish

        Hi Judith. I think I may have been misunderstood a little (and being male I often speak before I think) My comments were that to have something ‘not’ make money was “pointless to ME (but maybe not others)” The intention was to help others see that writing can be treated as a business with the right mindset. I spend hours a day developing a brand and is only scratching the surface – yet I sell more and make more money than some who are lauded as emerging icons (even without heaps of ‘organised’ review swaps that many ‘arrange’). The intention isn’t to diss anyone who is spending more than they are making out of writing, but to change the perception that one ‘must’ do that…and I did finish what I said by saying…that I will “probably change my opinion on things many times over.” as I continue on. You are right about building a platform. It must be done and some will spend $$$ doing it while others will spend time doing it and yet others both time and $$$ doing it. I’m just doing it with time (which often is all that beginners have) and later on I may spend more than others around me would be? I wish you every success and all the best for 2015 and beyond.

  • I listened to this podcast while on Christmas vacation in California, and when flying back to the East Coast saw the magazine with Judith’s article in my seat pocket! Of course, not being able to read Spanish I have no idea what it said, but I was excited to see something I’d just been listening to! Apparently, American Airlines doesn’t just place those magazines on South American flights!

    • SimonRSP

      Wow, that is really cool :). Thanks for sharing!

  • Judith Glynn

    Hi Leslye, Wow. Obviously I’m delighted with your post and Nexos tucked into a seat pocket on a U.S. flight. English version here: http://hub.aa.com/en/nx/judith-glynn-to-write-is-to-live. How would you like an ebook version of either book? If yes, contact me at http://www.judithglynn and we’ll begin. This offer also applies to others who post. You, too, Simon.

    • SimonRSP

      Yes please. Just emailed you :).

  • While I understand where DB is coming from with treating writing as a business, I think Judith represents the 95% of other writers out there. Many of us are not lucky to make a living with our writing (even if we do all the right things we’re supposed to do), and we are spending years chugging along producing quality content while we slowly build our brand. Some of us are content with this pace, while I can understand it can be frustrating or mind-boggling to others. I really like listening to more people like Judith who’s on the other side of the fence and how she copes with building her brand and making things work. Thank you, Judith, for sharing your wealth of knowledge, and thanks, Simon, for having her on your show!

    • SimonRSP

      Sure thing RM, I agree, I think it is good to have a diverse number of guests, and try to keep the show balanced :).